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Web video wends its way to new TVs

Web video wends its way to new TVs

Matsushita unveiled new TVs at the International Consumer Electronics Show that will allow users to browse videos on YouTube. Meanwhile, rival Sony announced that it will launch TVs with access to free Web video content. "Internet video will clearly be the next step in the evolution of high-definition television, giving users more control over the content they view," said Sony Electronics senior vice president Randy Waynick. After taking the Internet by storm, soon YouTube will be available on televisions. The Japanese giant behind the Panasonic brand said Tuesday that it will introduce Internet-ready plasma TVs in North America in the spring that allow users to browse videos on YouTube and photos from Google-based web albums. "This is the first time mainstream consumers will be able to easily enjoy YouTube videos from the living room with the enhanced quality of a fully integrated widescreen TV experience," said Matsushita Electric Industrial. Streaming Video Rival Sony also announced that from this spring it will launch televisions offering access to free Internet video content from providers including AOL, Yahoo, Sony Pictures Entertainment and Sony BMG Music. The TVs will be able to receive streaming broadband video, including high-definition content, Sony said. Both announcements were made at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. "Internet video will clearly be the next step in the evolution of high-definition television, giving users more control over the content they view," said Sony Electronics senior vice president Randy Waynick. Sony Content Sony Pictures Television also announced that it will put some of its content on YouTube through several channels supported by advertising. The first channel, called "Minisode Network," will offer five-minute versions of popular television shows. Since buying YouTube in 2006 for US$1.65 billion, Google has been under fire from video owners including entertainment giant Viacom and the English soccer league for not doing more to stop users from posting copyrighted clips. No responsibility can be taken for the content of external Internet sites.

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