Sales
0161 215 3700
0800 458 4545
Support
0800 230 0032
0161 215 3711

Google Responds To Annoyed Users Over Auto-Complete

Google Responds To Annoyed Users Over Auto-Complete

Hundreds of Google users have taken to the firm's message board to voice their displeasure at an inability to turn off the search engine's auto-complete feature.

On a message thread entitled How do I turn off auto-complete? a user known as 'thelostpineapple' asked why the option is no longer available.

"There used to be an option to turn off query suggestions/autocomplete in the search settings, but it doesn't look like the option is there anymore," he said.

Google responded with a post by Kelly F, listed as an 'associate with consumer operations', who explained that the firm had purposefully removed the ability for the feature to be disabled.

"With regard to your post, it's in keeping with our vision of a unified Google search experience to make popular, useful features part of the default experience, rather than maintain different versions of Google," she said.

"As auto-complete quality has improved, we felt it was appropriate to have it always on for all of our users."

This response did little to appease the disgruntled users, and 367 comments had been posted on the thread at the time of publication, the vast majority attacking Google for the move.

"As a result of losing the ability to shut off auto-complete on Google, I am changing my homepage and default search engine from Google to another search engine on the five web browsers I use," said one.

Another said: "If Google forces everyone to do searches [its] own way, that defeats the purpose of having user preferences. What were the company's strange motives for permanently activating auto-complete even when no-one's logged in?"

Some users have started a petition to ask Google to reconsider, but it has just 15 signatories so far.

Read more: http://www.computing.co.uk/v3/news/2269687/google-users-angry-inability#ixzz0zQQJ2DWw

Computing - Insight for IT leaders Claim your free subscription today.


print this article

Return to internet news headlines
View Internet News Archive

Share with: