Sales
0161 215 3700
0800 458 4545
Support
0800 230 0032
0161 215 3711

Microsoft eyes supercomputer market

Microsoft eyes supercomputer market

Microsoft Corp., which built its business by aiming to put a "computer on every desk" is moving into the high-end supercomputing market as hardware becomes more affordable, Chairman Bill Gates said yesterday.

The world's largest software maker will offer a version of Windows called "Compute Cluster Server 2003" that offers high performance computing by tying together several personal computers in a high-speed network that allows them to crunch huge amounts of data to simulate weather, analyse DNA and process other research-level tasks.

"Microsoft wants to play a role here," Gates told Supercomputing 2005, an industry gathering being held in Seattle this week.

Gates said that supercomputers, once considered massive mainframe machines that only researchers, a few companies and governments could afford, are becoming smaller and cheaper to the point where a clustered supercomputer system could be built for as little as $10,000 (5,800 pounds).

The market for computer clusters built on Intel Corp.'s "x86" microprocessors used in more than 90 percent of PCs is growing at 15 to 20 percent per year, faster than the 11 percent growth in the PC market, and is expected to swell to as many as 300,000 installed machines by the end of the decade, Microsoft said.

To tap into that growth and compete against Linux -- the freely available operating system that is also being used to create clustered computer systems -- Microsoft is set to launch Computer Cluster Server in the first half of 2006. The latest beta, or test version, of the software was released yesterday.

Kyril Faenov, director of Microsoft's high-performance computing unit, said that the software will be designed to be easier to use, so that tasks can be displayed visually and systems can be configured more quickly.


print this article

Return to internet news headlines
View Internet News Archive

Share with: