Hackers leaving mobile providers around the world vulnerable

For the past seven years hackers have infiltrated more than a dozen mobile carriers around Europe, Asia, Africa and the Middle East.

For the past seven years hackers have infiltrated more than a dozen mobile carriers around Europe, Asia, Africa and the Middle East. The attackers have been stealing sensitive data and unsubtly gaining access to call records and location data of the millions of users.

Cybereason, a security company based in Boston, admitted that the hackers have so much control they could easily shut down communications within the continents at a moment’s notice.

With this being a massive breach, companies are struggling with coming up with ways to protect their customers’ data.

Amit Serper, Cybereason’s head of security research said: "They have all the usernames and passwords, and created a bunch of domain privileges for themselves, with more than one user. They can do whatever they want. Since they have such access, they could shut down the network tomorrow if they wanted to."

Cybereason found that the hackers were more interested in espionage than disruption – gaining access to the mobile carriers would provide information such as geolocation data, call logs and text message records of all users.

However, even though having access to all customers, the hackers only stole data from fewer of 100 victims. It is clear that the attackers only targeted high profile victims who were involved in government and military activities.

Cybereason researchers found that the hackers were able to breach the security system by exploiting old vulnerabilities such as malware or an exposed public server.

All digital forensic signs point to the China hacking group APT10 as the attack method was sophisticated and targeted that it is believed to be backed by a nation- state.

The investigation is ongoing as the hackers continue to find more companies to attack. Unfortunately individuals who are having their data tracked would be unaware of anything going on, therefore, the amount of customers it effects is still unknown.

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