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Computer Passes Turing Test

Computer Passes Turing Test

For the first time, a computer program has passed the Turing Test, marking a milestone in artificial intelligence history.

The software passed the test by convincing a third of judges they were having a text conversation with a 13 year old boy, called Eugene Gootsman.

The Turing Test 2014 tested five pieces of software and was organised by the University of Reading, in collaboration with the EU funded Robo-Law organisation.

The winning software was developed in Russia by Vladimir Veselov and Eugene Demchenko.

Mathematician, codebreaker and computer science pioneer Alan Turing, was instrumental in cracking Germany's Enigma code during World War Two. Turing originated the concept of a "universal machine" that could act and think like a human.

Kevin Warwick, a visiting professor at the University of Reading said: "This milestone will go down in history as one of the most exciting.

"Some will claim that the [Turing] Test has already been passed. The words Turing Test have been applied to similar competitions around the world.

"However this event involved the most simultaneous comparison tests than ever before, was independently verified and, crucially, the conversations were unrestricted.

"A true Turing Test does not set the questions or topics prior to the conversations. We are therefore proud to declare that Alan Turing's Test was passed for the first time on Saturday."


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