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Big Data Security Analytics Still 'Immature'

Big Data Security Analytics Still 'Immature'

According to a panel of security experts, while big data security analytics promises to deliver greater insights in the battle against security threats, the tools and concepts are still undeveloped.

Peter Fonash, CTO for the cyber security office at the US Department of Homeland Security said the US Computer Response Team has yet to achieve its vision for big data security analytics.

Fonash told the Global Cyber Security Innovation Summit in London: "We are still working towards our vision of a cyber threat 'weather map' that is predictive."

An important goal for big data analytics is to enable organisations to identify unknown indicators of attack.

At the recent Nato summit in Wales, CERT UK was able to mine social media data to support operations to maintain cyber security at the event.

Neil Cassidy, deputy director for operations in the UK's National Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT-UK) said: "However, handling unstructured data and combing it with structured data to arrive at an accurate assessment is one of the big challenges.

"At the NATO conference, it was challenging to establish what claims were true and which were false to know what was actually happening."

Suppliers have said however, that big data security analytics is already delivering value, by enabling organisations to analyse data from previously disconnected security data sources.

Feris Rifai, CEO of analytics firm Bay Dynamics added: "Attackers are exploiting the fact that security data is in silos.

"Security analytics is not only about big data repositories, it is also about collecting together lots of small bits of data from point solutions to make better decisions."

Rifari believes the need for big data security analytics has never been greater because IT security professionals can more quickly identify what they need to prioritise.

He added: "By looking at the intersections between data from multiple sources, security professionals can more quickly identify what they need to prioritise."


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