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Google's Android Closing Gap on Symbian

Google's Android Closing Gap on Symbian

Android chief Andy Rubin tweeted that Google is now activating about 300,000 Android handsets per day. In January, that rate was 60,000 per day. Android's rate of growth has increased five-fold in the last 11 months.

In early August, Google CEO Eric Schmidt announced that Android's daily activation rate had reached 200,000. A mighty feat, more than double the pace of iPhone sales (at that time).

The Symbian Foundation was quick to respond, however, and said that it was already activating 300,000 Symbian devices per day. Well, now Android and Google are activating the same number of smartphones per day.

It's officially time for Nokia and Symbian to be worried (if they weren't sufficiently nervous already).

In just two years, Google's Android smartphone platform has gone from zero to 300,000 handsets sold per day, matching the world leader.

Android's daily sales figures don't have to grow that much for it to oust Nokia's Symbian platform as the most prevalent smartphone system worldwide in 2011, as some analysts believe it will. Nokia has already lost the top spot in Australia.

Google and its handset and carrier partners have not relented in their attack. The number of Android-based smartphones introduced this year numbers in the dozens. Nokia can't say the same for its Symbian lineup.

In fact, Nokia has fielded only one semi-capable handset this year: the N8. Several more have been announced by Nokia, but they aren't yet available for sale.

Nokia is working furiously to refocus its smartphone efforts. It has brought on a new CEO, Stephen Elop, and is working to improve its user interface. But by the time Nokia gets around to shipping any of these fresh designs, Android will already be leagues ahead.

Nokia doesn't need to worry about staying ahead of the competition any more, it has to worry about how far behind it might fall.


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