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IT Staff Feel Badly Treated in Comparison To Others

IT Staff Feel Badly Treated in Comparison To Others

Half of IT people feel they are treated badly. In a survey of 200 UK IT professionals, the agency found that 48 per cent of them feel that they are treated "slightly worse" or "much worse" than their fellow employees. Just 14 per cent felt they were treated better.

"Many IT professionals clearly feel they are not receiving the same treatment as their colleagues," said Phil Handley, operations director at IntaPeople. "It is not unusual for incentives to be focused mainly around the sales team, but it is just as important that firms recognise and reward the contribution of those supporting this function."

His view was also supported by the fact that 29 per cent felt that a pay rise would make them feel happier but, showing a truly professional view, 38 per cent said that a positive response to their long-term goals would be enough.

Ongoing training obviously forms a key part of supporting these long term goals. One respondent noted: "Employers need to be aware that IT employees need to keep up to date. A savvy IT professional is always aware that their skills can become rapidly obsolete."

Handley pointed out that part of this training can be given by providing better tools. "IT workers are ever mindful that they operate within a fast-moving industry, and would therefore prefer to join a company that allows them to improve their skills and work with up-to-date systems, as opposed to using older technologies that are unsupported and could severely limit their potential," he said.

If they feel dissatisfied, what would make an IT professional quit? Poor management was the top answer for 38 per cent of the respondents and 20 per cent said low pay.

"It's all too easy to overlook the significance of some of the day-to-day duties carried out by IT staff," Handley said, "and, unfortunately, their true value is often only realised after they have left."

When leaving is on the agenda a large proportion of the professionals felt that job opportunities will increase in the next year. Though the feeling was definitely mixed, 43 per cent felt prospects would improve despite 31 per cent taking a pessimistic view of a worsening employment market.

One statistic showed that it may not take much to retain a happy IT workforce. 21 per cent said that a kind word now and again would make them feel more valued.


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